8 thoughts on “POPE BENEDICT XVI’S TEACHING ON MUNUS AND MINISTERIUM”

  1. Further, the Code of Canon Law states that a pope can resign either by explicitly expressing his intention to do so, or by “losing the use of reason” or losing the ability to freely exercise his office. In the case of Pope Benedict XVI, he made a public statement expressing his intention to resign, which was accepted by the College of Cardinals. The resignation was considered to be valid because it was made freely and voluntarily, and was not the result of any external coercion or pressure.

    The acceptance of the resignation by the College of Cardinals was also an important part of the process. According to the Code of Canon Law, the resignation of a pope becomes effective only when it is accepted by the College of Cardinals. In the case of Pope Benedict XVI, his resignation was accepted by the College of Cardinals, who then proceeded to elect a new pope, Pope Francis, to succeed him.

    In summary, the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI was considered to be valid by the Catholic Church because it was made freely and voluntarily, and was accepted by the College of Cardinals in accordance with the established legal procedures for papal resignations.

    To dissect the resignation further is superfluous. The overwhelming majority of both Conciliar and Traditional Catholics accept the resignation of Benedict XVI. He himself has repeated it over and over. It is sad and unfortunate that a few folks can’t get past it. Its been ten years. And still the vast majority of Catholics accept Francis even if they employ the ‘recognize and resist’ position. I feel sympathy for those who want Benedict but really it is a foolish argument.

    Reply
    • The Code of Canon Law requires that the pope renounce his “munus” for him to relinquish the papacy. But Pope Benedict XVI renounced something other than his munus (even though he mentioned the munus a couple of times in his Declaratio), namely the ministerium. His refusal to renounce the munus demonstrates his intention to retain it. Hence, he remains pope.

      The acceptance or rejection of the renunciation of a pope by the College of Cardinals has no bearing on the validity or invalidity of the renunciation. If a pope truly renounces his munus, the cardinals’ rejecting it has no bearing on the juridical effect. The same goes for an invalid renunciation.

      The “renunciation” of Pope Benedict XVI was not according to any Canon of the Code. Hence, he remains pope.

      The whole world can accept the “renunciation” of Pope Benedict XVI as valid. This has no bearing on whether it was truly valid. The only thing that really counts is his Declaratio, in which he only renounced the ministerium. I feel little sympathy for those who refuse to look at the reality, but instead accept an antipope as pope.

      Reply
      • It is a fact that over the last nearly 10 years, Benedict has many times acknowledged Francis as pope.

        Whatever mess Benedict created in his resignation, i.e. not being clear enough in his choice of words for some folks, it doesn’t matter. He resigned. He then retired. He then acknowledged his successor. Pretty clear. Even a child could understand.

        Perhaps the imperfect form of the resignation could be attributed to the general confusion that has reigned in Benedict’s mind as one of the chief architects of Vatican II. But even if his form is imperfect – according to some – he has certainly given no doubt as to his intention to truly resign.

        I think we all agree no good came of that resignation, on multiple levels. But here we are. May God’s will be done. He is allowing the punishment of a bad pope for our sanctification.

        Reply
        • Pope Benedict XVI can acknowledge Francis as pope 100,000,000 times. None of them have juridical value. Neither what you nor I say has juridical value. What has juridical value is his Declaration of 2013. Benedict XVI in that Declaratio wrote what he was doing, that is, renouncing the exercise of the active ministry. Hence, he remains pope.

          Reply
          • Pope Benedict XVI resigned from the papacy in 2013, citing his advanced age and declining health as the reasons for his decision.

            The resignation was considered to be valid by the Catholic Church because it was made freely and voluntarily, and was accepted by the College of Cardinals, who are responsible for electing a new pope.

            According to the Code of Canon Law, a pope is allowed to resign from office under certain circumstances, and the resignation of Benedict XVI was in line with the established legal procedures for papal resignations.

            Finito.

            Reply
            • Pope Benedict XVI renounced the “ministerium” because of , as he states, his advancing age and declining health.

              The cardinals have no authority to reject a valid renunciation or accept an invalid renunciation. They did the latter.

              The “renunciation” of Pope Benedict XVI was not in line with Canon Law.

              Reply

Leave a Comment